BBC World Service – Heart and Soul, Lipa Schmelzer: The Jewish Lady Gaga

Broadcasts

  • BBC World Service excludes Australasia, East Asia & South Asia.
  • BBC World Service is available only in Australasia, South Asia, and East Asia.
  • The BBC Global Service can be accessed exclusively in the Americas and the Caribbean, Eastern and Southern Africa, South Asia, Western and Central Africa, and Eastern Asia.
  • BBC Global Service News Online.
  • BBC Global Service News Online.
  • BBC World Service Australasia is available on UK DAB/Freeview and Online platforms only.
  • Only available in East and Southern Africa and West and Central Africa is the BBC World Service.
  • BBC World Service excludes East and Southern Africa and West and Central Africa.
  • BBC World Service excludes Australasia, East Asia & South Asia.
  • BBC World Service is available only in Australasia, South Asia, and East Asia.
  • The BBC Global Service can be accessed exclusively in the Americas and the Caribbean, Eastern and Southern Africa, South Asia, Western and Central Africa, and Eastern Asia.
  • BBC Global Service News Online.
  • Only available in East and Southern Africa and West and Central Africa is the BBC World Service.
  • The BBC World Service covers all regions except East and Southern Africa, East Asia, South Asia, and West and Central Africa.
  • BBC World Service excludes the Americas and the Caribbean, East and Southern Africa, UK DAB/Freeview, and West and Central Africa.
  • Download

    Lipa Schmelzer: The Jewish Lady Gaga

    Lipa Schmeltzer is a prominent figure in the realm of Jewish music, but not within the realm of traditional music.

    Lipa Schmeltzer is a shining star in the world of Jewish music, as his music sounds like nothing but traditional Jewish music; he has actually been called the ‘Jewish Lady Gaga’.

    He began again until it wasn’t long, but he had apologized publicly to the modern music community and agreed to concentrate on studying the Bible and stop performing and writing his own songs when his rabbi and father told him to. However, he had always dreamt of being a singer, even though his teachers called him a “dumb kid” and told him he would never amount to anything. He found it hard to concentrate when he was taught all subjects in Yiddish at school because he grew up in an ultra-conservative Hasidic community in New York.

    Lipa’s music represented a split in his Jewish Hasidic community, with older, more reserved Jewish people who thought it was disrespectful and wanted to lead people away from the holy scripture, and younger Jewish Hasidic individuals who loved the modern Jewish beats and wanted him to perform at their children’s bar mitzvahs and weddings.

    When Colm Flynn traveled to New York to visit Lipa, he discovered that it is not consistently effortless for Lipa to remain faithful to his origins while crafting contemporary Jewish music. Nowadays, Lipa resides in both spheres.